Movie – No Country For Old Men [REVIEW] – In The Open Country You Can Find Anything, But Every Fortune Leaves A Trail

IMDb Rating: 8,1/10
Genres: Crime, Drama, Thriller
Directors: Ethan CoenJoel Coen
Writers: Joel CoenEthan Coen
Stars: Tommy Lee Jones, Javier Bardem, Josh Brolin


“Good or bad movie can be seen from the wise character.” Roger Ebert, movie critics. The word refers to this movie directed by the Coen brothers, “No Country for Old Men.” When watching this movie, made me half-dead thinking. In fact, that ending is what people say is the most boring ending ever. Because a highly anti-climactic ending makes some people think that this movie isn’t quality. Why?

In rural Texas, welder and hunter Llewelyn Moss discovers the remains of several drug runners who have all killed each other in an exchange gone violently wrong. Rather than report the discovery to the police, Moss decides to simply take the two million dollars present for himself. This puts the psychopathic killer, Anton Chigurh, on his trail as he dispassionately murders nearly every rival, bystander and even employer in his pursuit of his quarry and the money. As Moss desperately attempts to keep one step ahead, the blood from this hunt begins to flow behind him with relentlessly growing intensity as Chigurh closes in. Meanwhile, the laconic Sheriff Ed Tom Bell blithely oversees the investigation even as he struggles to face the sheer enormity of the crimes he is attempting to thwart.

Source: IMDb

Javier Bardem

The movie takes place in Texas in the 1980s. The impression of the arid western region of America, barren, cannot be separated from the laws of nature, the strong is the win, the weak can only succumb. It could be this movie is a source of inspiration from some other cowboy films. Although like that, this film isn’t the western genre. If in a western movie featuring a fight between good and bad, then “No Country for Old Men” is a film that doesn’t show that stereotypes. In this movie, you can’t guess which one is good and which is bad. Then, who is good and bad?

Josh Brolin in No Country for Old Men (2007)

When viewed from the outside perception, Chigurh is the bad guy. Though he’s a murderer, he doesn’t do it blindly. He has high principles, even as he determines people’s lives based on coin tosses. A murderer who has his own code of conduct kills mercilessly but still keeps himself from being stained with blood. While Moss is a very difficult character to guess. He has a very ambitious and stubborn nature. But, he is also very worried about his wife’s safety. As a veteran, he still has high self-esteem. Despite that, he is still being hunted by several people.

Tommy Lee Jones in No Country for Old Men (2007)

Tom Bell isn’t an ideal character. In a way, Tom Bell is the person in the comfort zone. He doesn’t seem to want to come face-to-face with Chigurh. Therefore, he always left behind step by Chigurh and Moss. Tom Bell can be defined as someone who is no longer accepted by the world that he can’t understand. Coen brothers re-raised their successful theme through “Fargo” into this movie. Pessimism and nihilism were handed down directly by Cormac McCarthy who writes the novel and became the most successful film of the year.

4 Star


Some audience feels so disappointed with this movie. One of them is an anti-climactic ending. Coen brothers don’t seem to want to show the side of the moral message or something. In fact, this film is a movie that is very similar to our daily reality of life.

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